No-deal Brexit not good for Britain: UK minister Rudd

LONDON (Reuters) – A no-deal Brexit would not be good for Britain but the government is right to make preparations in case of such an outcome, Britain’s work and pensions minister Amber Rudd said on Friday.

“I do not think that no deal will be good for this country,” Rudd told BBC radio. “I’m committed to making sure we find an alternative.”

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Boris Johnson and Amber Rudd yawn during Brexit Commons appearance

Haven’t you quit yet, Theresa? May’s rivals look tired of waiting as she postpones Brexit vote in brutal Commons session

  • Boris Johnson and Amber Rudd were both spotted yawning deeply in Commons 
  • Both Conservative MPs have been tipped as leadership rivals to Theresa May
  • PM faced a torrid few hours in Commons as she announced delay to Brexit vote 
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Boris Johnson and Amber Rudd looked bored as they listened to the PM’s crucial Brexit statement today – as they both failed to stifle big yawns.

Theresa May appeared in the Commons today to confirm to MPs that she is delaying the crunch vote on her Brexit deal to avoid a massive and humiliating defeat.

She announced the embarrassing U-turn and confirmed that she will be going on a tour of European capitals to try to squeeze more concessions out of the EU.

But two of her leadership rivals looked bored as they yawned deeply during her mammoth statement to MPs. 

Mr Johnson, who quit as Foreign Secretary earlier this year in fury at the PM’s Brexit deal, looked sleepy as he sat slumped in his spot on the backbench.


Boris Johnson (pictured in the Commons today) could not help but yawn as the PM appeared in the Commons to confirm the crunch vote on her Brexit deal will be delayed 


Amber Rudd, who is widely tipped as a leadership contender if Theresa May is ousted from power amid the Brexit chaos, also  yawned while sat on the frontbench

  • May admits she would have LOST key Brexit vote and vows to… Commons Speaker John Bercow blasts ‘deeply discourteous’ May…

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While Ms Rudd, who made a dramatic return to the frontbench as Work and Pensions Secretary last month, also yawned deeply from her seat near Mrs May’s.

The pair have both been tipped as top contenders if Mrs May is toppled as as Tory leader over the Brexit chaos. 

Mr Johnson has spent the past week effectively laying out his pitch for the leadership by laying out his blueprint for the Brexit talks.

And he showed off a new, smarter haircut on TV yesterday in what was widely seen as a leadership makeover. 

Mrs May faced a torrid few hours in the Commons this afternoon as she confirmed the vote on her Brexit deal could be delayed for six weeks. 

The PM faced MPs after finally bowing to massive pressure to delay the crunch vote which had been due tomorrow. 

She insisted her blueprint was still the ‘best deal negotiable’, and said she still planned to put it to a vote once ‘reassurances’ had been secured on the Irish border backstop – but implied that might not happen before January 21. 


Theresa May was on her feet for hours to defend her negotiating strategy to a packed Commons Chamber (pictured) amid a barrage of criticism form all sides 

But she faced a barrage of attacks from all sides as Remainers and Brexiteers queued up to slam her deal.   

The premier was also given an extraordinary dressing down by Speaker John Bercow who accused her of ‘discourtesy’ for abandoning the vote after four days of debate – urging her to show ‘maturity’ by giving MPs their say. 

The Pound plunged further against the US dollar as markets took fright at the political carnage. 

Amid a cacophony of taunts and barracking from MPs in the chamber, Mrs May said: ‘While there is broad support for many of the key aspects of the deal on one issue – the Northern Ireland backstop – there remains widespread and deep concern.

‘As a result, if we went ahead and held that vote that deal would be rejected by a significant margin.

‘We will therefore defer the vote scheduled for tomorrow, and not proceed to divide the House at this time.’      

Who could replace Theresa May? As Brexiteers move against the Prime Minister because of her deal ‘betrayal’ these are some of the leading contenders to take over

Theresa May looks certain to face a vote of no confidence after her Brexit deal was rejected out of hand by Eurosceptics.

If she loses the Tory Party will launch a leadership contest to replace her – a process that will likely take weeks with just months until Brexit Day.

These are some of the leading contenders to replace her:

Dominic Raab

How did they vote on Brexit?

Leave, with a second tier role campaigning for Vote Leave.

What is their view now?

Mr Raab was installed as Brexit Secretary to deliver the Chequers plan but sensationally resigned today saying the deal is not good enough.

What are their chances?

Being the first to resign from the Cabinet has put a rocket booster under Mr Raab’s chances, fuelling his popularity among the hardline Brexiteers. May struggle to overcome bigger beasts and better known figures.

Odds: About 11-2


Newly installed as Brexit Secretary, Dominic Raab (pictured in Downing Street on Tuesday) is trying to negotiate Theresa May’s Brexit deal

Boris Johnson

How did they vote on Brexit?

Led the Vote Leave campaign alongside Michael Gove.

What is their view now?

Hard line Brexiteer demanding a clean break from Brussels. The former foreign secretary is violently opposed to Theresa May’s Chequers plan and a leading voice demanding a Canada-style trade deal.

What are their chances?

Rated as second favourite by the bookies, Mr Johnson’s biggest challenge will be navigating the Tory leadership rules. He may be confident of winning a run-off among Tory members but must first be selected as one of the top two candidates by Conservative MPs.

Odds: 5/1


Rated as second favourite by the bookies, Boris Johnson’s (pictured at Tory conference last month) biggest challenge will be navigating the Tory leadership rules

Sajid Javid

How did they vote on Brexit?

Remain but kept a low profile in the referendum.

What is their view now?

Pro delivering Brexit and sceptical of the soft Brexit options.

What are their chances?

Probably the leading candidate from inside the Cabinet after his dramatic promotion to Home Secretary. Mr Javid has set himself apart from Mrs May on a series of policies, notably immigration.

Favourite with several of the bookies at around 5/1.


Sajid Javid (pictured in Downing Street) is probably the leading candidate from inside the Cabinet after his dramatic promotion to Home Secretary

Jeremy Hunt

How did they vote on Brexit?

Remain.

What is their view now?

The Foreign Secretary claims the EU Commission’s ‘arrogance’ has made him a Brexiteer.

What are their chances?

Another top contender inside Cabinet, Mr Hunt’s stock rose during his record-breaking stint at the Department of Health and won a major promotion to the Foreign Office after Mr Johnson’s resignation. Widely seen as a safe pair of hands which could be an advantage if the contest comes suddenly.

Rated around 8/1 by the bookies.


Jeremy Hunt’s stock rose during his record-breaking stint at the Department of Health and won a major promotion to the Foreign Office after Mr Johnson’s resignation

David Davis

How did they vote on Brexit?

Leave.

What is their view now?

Leave and a supporter of scrapping Mrs May’s plan and pursuing a Canada-style trade deal with the EU.

What are their chances?

The favoured choice of many hard Brexiteers. Seen as a safer pair of hands than Mr Johnson and across the detail of the current negotiation after two years as Brexit Secretary. He could be promoted a caretaker to see through Brexit before standing down.

Unlikely to be the choice of Remain supporters inside the Tory Party – and has been rejected by the Tory membership before, in the 2005 race against David Cameron.

Rated around 11/1 by the bookies.


David Davis (pictured last month at a Brexiteer policy launch) is seen as a safer pair of hands than Mr Johnson and across the detail of the current negotiation after two years as Brexit Secretary

Amber Rudd

How did they vote on Brexit?

Remain. Represented Britain Stronger in Europe in the TV debates.

What is their view now?

Strongly remain and supportive of a second referendum – particularly given a choice between that and no deal.

What are their chances?

Popular among Conservative MPs as the voice of Cameron-style Toryism, Ms Rudd is still seen as a contender despite resigning amid the Windrush scandal – and she was boosted further by her return to Cabinet as Work and Pensions Secretary on Friday night. She is badly hampered by having a tiny majority in her Hastings constituency and would not be able to unite the Tory party in a sudden contest over the Brexit negotiation.

Out to 50/1 among many bookies.


Popular among Conservative MPs as the voice of Cameron-style Toryism, Amber Rudd (pictured at Tory conference last month) is still seen as a contender despite resigning amid the Windrush scandal

Penny Mordaunt

How did they vote on Brexit?

Leave

What is their view now?

Leave and subject of persistent rumour she could be the next to quit Cabinet over Mrs May’s Brexit deal.

What are their chances?

Possible dark horse in the contest, Ms Mordaunt is not well known to the public but is seen as a contender in Westminster. She has been encouraged to join the Cabinet revolt over the Brexit deal and could resign within hours.

Bookies rate her around 16/1.


Possible dark horse in the contest, Penny Mordaunt (pictured in Downing Street) is not well known to the public but is seen as a contender in Westminster

 

 

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