TV & Movies

Top 5 films: our guide to the best weekend viewing

MARNIE
​(130 minutes) MA

Much of what Alfred Hitchcock felt or imagined about women is packed into this 1964 tale of a compulsive thief (Tippi Hedren) and her brutish would-be saviour (Sean Connery). The result remains divisive, but if you can set your preconceptions aside, it is one of Hitch's boldest and most fascinating films. Screens as part of a Hitchcock retrospective. Digitally projected. Lido, Classic and Cameo, Sunday, January 27, 4pm.

Juliette Binoche in Claire Denis’ Let the Sunshine In.Credit:Madman Films

CLUELESS
(97 minutes) PG

Relocating the plot of Jane Austen's Emma to a Beverly Hills high school, Amy Heckerling's fast, funny, upbeat 1995 teen movie ranks with the classic Hollywood comedies of any era. Alicia Silverstone is irresistible as the ditzy but hardly dim-witted heroine, full of solutions to everyone's problems but her own. Digitally projected. Rooftop Cinema (Curtin House), Saturday, January 26, 9.30pm.

E.T. THE EXTRA TERRESTRIAL
(115 minutes) PG

A small boy from the suburbs (Henry Thomas) meets a friendly visitor from outer space in this 1982 science-fiction tearjerker, featuring brilliant animatronic effects by Carlo Rambaldi and a career-making appearance by the six-year-old Drew Barrymore. Turning shameless sentimentality into an artform, it is one of the two or three essential Steven Spielberg classics. Digitally projected. Astor, Sunday, January 27, 2pm.

LET THE SUNSHINE IN
(96 minutes) MA

Two legends of French cinema, director Claire Denis and star Juliette Binoche, team up for the first time in this romantic comedy about a hapless divorcee stumbling from one dubious man to the next. The material may seem conventional by Denis' standards, but the rhythms are as surprising as ever. ACMI, Saturday, January 26, 2pm and 6.45pm.

CRUEL INTENTIONS
(97 minutes) MA

Roger Kumble's 1999 reworking of Dangerous Liaisons as an American teen movie works better than anyone could have anticipated, thanks to a terrific cast and a script that blends intelligence, humour and no-holds-barred sleaze. Sarah Michelle Gellar and Ryan Philippe play the sexually manipulative villains, with Reese Witherspoon and Selma Blair as the innocents they seek to entrap. Digitally projected. Rooftop Cinema, Sunday, January 27, 9.30pm.

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