Alex Jones claims he funded rally that led to Capitol chaos

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Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones claims he put up nearly $500,000 to mount President Trump’s disastrous speech Wednesday in Washington, DC — and was asked by the White House to lead the subsequent march that devolved into a riotous siege of Capitol Hill.

“No one would book the Ellipse, no one would book the other areas. No one would pay for it. We went and paid for it,” Jones said in a video posted to his InfoWars website Thursday and reported by The Independent.

“Thank God a donor came in and paid like 80 percent of it,” he went on. “Because it cost close to half a million dollars, with all the equipment, all the stages and the rest of it. Port-a-Potties, you name it.”

Jones did not name the anonymous benefactor — but he did shed light on an initial plan to have the Secret Service escort Jones through the gathered Trump supporters so he could head a procession to the Capitol.

“The White House told me three days before, we’re going to have you lead the march,” Jones said.

“And Trump will tell people, go and I’m going to meet you at the Capitol. But there was a million people outside,” he explained. “So by the time I got out there … there were already hundreds of thousands of people ahead of me marching.”

The video clip was posted to social media by Kelly Morales, Jones’s estranged wife.

Jones, who has appeared at multiple “Stop the Steal” rallies in the weeks since Election Day, was seen in the crowd outside the Capitol on Wednesday, but seems not to have entered the building, The Independent reported.

Jones has been in legal hot water for pushing bogus coronavirus cures on his website — and for using it to push the theory that the 26 deaths in the Sandy Hook school massacre were faked as part of an anti-Second Amendment plot.

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