Brexit news latest – Joe Biden election win throws MAJOR spanner in works as Boris insists UK-EU trade deal can be done

JOE Biden's US Presidential Election win has thrown a major spanner in the works of Brexit trade deal negotiations.

The President-Elect has previously expressed "significant concerns" about Boris Johnson's controversial Internal Market Bill, warning about the impact it could have on peace in Northern Ireland.

It is widely believed securing a UK-US post-Brexit trade deal will be far lower priority for the next Biden than it would have been for Trump, meaning the UK has a weaker hand to play during the ongoing negotiations with the EU.

The news comes as PM Boris Johnson said that a trade deal with the European Union was “there to be done”.

His upbeat stance comes as Brexit negotiators have been urged to see the UK as an "independent state".

Mr Johnson told reporters: “I think it's there to be done, the broad outlines are pretty clear. We just need to get on and do it if we can."

Follow our Brexit live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • Joseph Gamp

    UK THINK TANK TAKES ISSUE WITH NIGEL FARAGE'S NEW ANTI-LOCKDOWN PARTY NAME

    Nigel Farage's plan to rebrand the Brexit Party as the anti-lockdown Reform UK has hit a snag.

    Think tank Reform has written to the Electoral Commission to complain about the proposed name change, arguing it could lead to “voter confusion”.

    The think tank, which argues for public service reform, has also written to Mr Farage asking him to reconsider.

    The Brexit Party has applied to the Electoral Commission to formally change its name, with Mr Farage arguing that as well as keeping an eye on Boris Johnson's negotiations with the EU “further reform in many other areas” is needed.

    Recently, party chairman Sir Richard Tice has said a new Covid-19 strategy is needed “so that we learn to live with it, not hide in fear of it”.

  • Joseph Gamp

    BIDEN ELECTION MAY HAVE IMPACT ON BREXIT TALKS, SAYS IRISH FOREIGN MINISTER

    Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney believes Joe Biden's election victory may have an impact on a crucial British-European Union trade talks this week, following the US president-elect's recent intervention in support of Ireland's position.

    Speaking to Ireland's RTE, Coveney said: “I think perhaps it does (make a difference).

    “Joe Biden is a real friend of Ireland, he is somebody who in the middle of this campaign has taken the time to make a very clear statement on the need to prevent a hard (Irish) border at any point in the future linked to Brexit policy.”

    “The relationship between Donald Trump and Boris Johnson was a close one and there was a lot of talk about a US/UK trade deal happening quickly.

    “Now that Joe Biden is going to be the next president, I certainly think that will be a cause for a pause for thought in Number 10 (Downing Street) to ensure Irish issues are prioritised as we try to close out this phase.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM TO PURSUE CONTROVERSIAL BREXIT BILL DESPITE JOE BIDEN WARNING

    Boris Johnson will proceed with his controversial Brexit bill despite US president-elect Joe Biden having previously warned the UK over the draft legislation.

    The Prime Minister told broadcasters, after congratulating Mr Biden and vice president-elect Kamala Harris on their victory, that he intended to push ahead with the Internal Market Bill, with peers due to vote on it this week.

    The bill would override clauses in the Withdrawal Agreement relating to Northern Ireland and the Government has admitted it breaks international law.

    Meanwhile, EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier is in London this week for talks with his UK counterpart Lord Frost as he seeks to “find an agreement that respects the interests and values of the EU and its 27 Member States”.

    Mr Biden, who has Irish heritage, in September warned that the Good Friday Agreement cannot be “a casualty of Brexit” and said a UK-US trade deal would be dependent on the peace terms being upheld.

  • Joseph Gamp

    EU'S BARNIER 'VERY HAPPY' TO BE BACK IN LONDON

    The European Union's Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said he was very happy to be back in London on Sunday and work would continue on securing a trade deal with Britain.

    “Very happy to be back in London and work continues,” he told Reuters when he arrived in the capital by train.

  • Joseph Gamp

    ENVIRONMENT SECRETARY ASSURES BIDEN THERE WILL BE NO HARD BORDER WITH IRELAND

    Environment Secretary George Eustice assured US President-elect Joe Biden that there will be no need for a hard border within the island of Ireland.

    Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme this morning, Mr Eustice said: “We are putting in place the facilities that will be needed to check agri-food goods as they enter and we're developing the customs procedures that will be needed for goods at risk of entering the EU.

    “All of that work is being done and because that work is being done there will be no need for checks on the Northern Ireland border.”

    He also insisted the UK is “committed to the spirit of the Withdrawal Agreement”.

  • Joseph Gamp

    POSSIBLE TO PICK UP US TRADE NEGOTIATIONS WITH JOE BIDEN

    Environment Secretary George Eustice said it could be possible to pick up on US trade negotiations with Joe Biden's administration where they were left with Donald Trump.

    Asked about whether talks had to start again from scratch, Mr Eustice told BBC Breakfast: “It doesn't if the new administration is happy to pick up where the previous one did.

    “That is possible and something that we will be exploring, but it's just too early to tell really.

    “It may be that obviously the time that it takes for a new administration to take root means there's some slippage in time, but we'll see once they're properly in place.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    NO WORD ON DROPPING INTERNAL MARKET BILL

    Foreign secretary Dominic Raab has declined to say whether the law-breaking Internal Market Bill – aimed at stopping the EU from mounting a food blockade on Northern Ireland – will now be dropped to appease US President-elect Joe Biden.

    The Democrat is against the measure, and regards it as a hindrance to future US-UK trade negotiations.

    Raab told Andrew Marr on the BBC that peers will consider the bill when they “go through that process” of examining it at committee stage at the House of Lords on Monday.

  • Abe Hawken

    'SENSIBLE APPROACH'

    Environment Secretary George Eustice indicated a possible compromise on fisheries in post-Brexit trade negotiations with the EU.

    He told Sky News: “On fisheries, we’ve always been open to doing a sensible approach looking particularly at agreements that might span a couple, three years for instance.

    “We’re going to be sensible in how we approach this but making sure that we have control of our own waters again and controlled access to our waters has always been a red line for us in these negotiations.”

  • Abe Hawken

    'CASUALTY OF BREXIT'

    Joe Biden, who has Irish heritage, in September warned that the Good Friday Agreement cannot be “a casualty of Brexit” and said a UK-US trade deal would be dependent on the peace terms being upheld.

    Boris Johnson, asked on Sunday whether he was determined to pass the bill in the face of Mr Biden’s criticisms, said: “Yes, as I told Ursula (von der Leyen, European Commission president) the parliamentary timetable goes ahead.

    “The whole point of that bill, and indeed the Finance Bill, is to protect and uphold the Good Friday Agreement and the peace process in Northern Ireland.

    “And again, that’s one of the things that we’re united on with our friends in the White House.”

  • Abe Hawken

    PUSH AHEAD

    Boris Johnson will proceed with his controversial Brexit bill despite US president-elect Joe Biden having previously warned the UK over the draft legislation.

    The Prime Minister told broadcasters, after congratulating Mr Biden and vice president-elect Kamala Harris on their victory, that he intended to push ahead with the Internal Market Bill, with peers due to vote on it this week.

    The bill would override clauses in the Withdrawal Agreement relating to Northern Ireland and the Government has admitted it breaks international law.

    Meanwhile, EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier is in London this week for talks with his UK counterpart Lord Frost as he seeks to “find an agreement that respects the interests and values of the EU and its 27 Member States”.

  • Abe Hawken

    TIME TO DEAL

    Michel Barnier says a good Brexit deal is needed owing to the ­terror threat in Europe.

    The EU chief negotiator told allies of his fears before London talks today.

    He said the recent attacks in France and ­Austria weighed heavily on his mind.

    He also feels “a weight of responsibility on my shoulders” to find a decent agreement given the economic fallout from Covid.

  • Debbie White

    CRITICISM OVER EU 'FOOT DRAGGING'

    UK negotiators are struggling with what they regard as Brussels' stubbornness over the fisheries issue.

    Michel Barnier – in talks on behalf of the EU – has told the bloc's ambassadors that Brussels is still keen on unfettered access to UK waters, reports The Mail on Sunday.

    But this push has been rejected in the UK as neither “reasonable” nor “realistic”.

    A source told the MoS: “It's a shame this is having to be done so quickly because of the EU's foot-dragging until very recently.

    “And there is still a long way to go; a deal is by no means certain unless we see a change of approach from Michel Barnier and his team.”

  • Debbie White

    NO WORD ON DROPPING INTERNAL MARKET BILL

    Foreign secretary Dominic Raab has declined to say whether the law-breaking Internal Market Bill – aimed at stopping the EU from mounting a food blockade on Northern Ireland – will now be dropped to appease US President-elect Joe Biden.

    The Democrat is against the measure, and regards it as a hindrance to future US-UK trade negotiations.

    Raab told Andrew Marr on the BBC that peers will consider the bill when they “go through that process” of examining it at committee stage at the House of Lords on Monday.

  • Debbie White

    DOMINIC RAAB: 'TALKS NEED TO GET OVER LINE'

    Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab told the Andrew Marr show on Sunday that Brexit trade “negotiations are still ongoing.

    “What I'll say is it's still down to two issues – there's progress that's been made, but we've got to see whether it's enough to get us over the line.”

    He explained to the BBC host: “There are some core issues at stake for the UK, points of democratic principles around control of our laws [and] control of our fishing as an independent coastal state.

    “I don't think we can toss those aside, but if the EU shows the flexibility that we need to meet us half way, I am confident a deal can still be done.”

  • Debbie White

    UK SHOULD BE TREATED AS INDEPENDENT STATE

    Brexit trade deal negotiators in Brussels have been advised that the UK needs to be treated like an independent state, writes The Mail on Sunday.

    The EU has also been told it needs to “get real” after talks faltered yet again on Saturday.

    Sources add that Brussels should change its stance and accept that the UK is an “independent state”.

    One said: “Unfortunately, we haven't achieved as much as we'd hoped during these intensive talks so far.

    “We still need more realism from the EU.”

  • Debbie White

    CHLORINATED CHICKEN OFF THE MENU?

    With Joe Biden announced as US President-elect, there are hopes that sub-standard American food, including chlorinated chicken, is now off the menu in post-Brexit trade talks.

    The Mail on Sunday reports that diplomatic sources say Biden is likely to snub Donald Trump's deal.

    They added that Biden will probably back a multi-lateral approach, which could include a trans-Pacific partnership based on high food standards.

  • Debbie White

    TARIFFS 'SLAPPED' ON WHISKY & STEEL UNDER TRUMP

    Former Chancellor Sajid Javid says he believes a trade deal with the US is now “far more likely”.

    He told the Sky News’ Sophy Ridge on Sunday show: “Let's look at the evidence, let's look at what Donald Trump actually did when he was in office when it came to trade with the UK.

    “He slapped tariffs on UK aluminium, UK steel, Scotch whisky – that not only hurt people in America in terms of higher prices, but it also cost jobs here in the UK.

    “President Trump is a protectionist, he has been very clear about that, he's paralysed the WTO (World Trade Organisation).

    “We now want to strike more trade deals across the world and actually what you need is a president who believes in free trade, and that's what we're going to have with [US President-elect] Joe Biden.”

  • Debbie White

    MARR TOLD 'DON'T MAKE ASSUMPTIONS'

    The British government has repeatedly said it will uphold the Good Friday Agreement, which ended 30 years of violence in the British province of Northern Ireland.

    On Sunday, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab accused the EU of putting it in jeopardy.

    He also advised BBC host Andrew Marr to stop making “assumptions” when it came to Brexit negotiations.

    Marr told Raab: “There's just a week left now to conclude any trade agreement with the EU, are we going to do it? Probably not, I assume.”

    The politician replied: “I wouldn't make assumptions, that's the one thing that we know about the Brexit process.”

  • Debbie White

    WHEN DO BREXIT TRADE TALKS RESUME?

    The chief negotiators, the EU's Michel Barnier and Britain's David Frost, will resume talks in London on Monday, November 9, to “redouble efforts to reach a deal”, Boris Johnson's office has said.

    Any deal should be agreed by mid-November to allow for ratification.

    Some firms hope that the time pressure and the Covid-19 crisis spiralling across much of Europe can focus minds to avoid disruption at the end of the year.

  • Debbie White

    UK INTERNAL MARKET BILL UNDER SCRUTINY IN HOUSE OF LORDS

    The House of Lords continues its committee stage, line-by-line examination, of the controversial UK Internal Market Bill on Monday November 9.

    Members are set to discuss changes to part five of the bill, removing provisions authorising breaches of the UK’s international law obligations under the Northern Ireland Protocol.

  • Debbie White

    UK URGED TO ACT ON INTERNAL MARKET BILL

    Neale Richmond, Irish Fine Gael politician has today tweeted that “the EU has signed up to an international agreement that ensures no return of a hard border post Brexit.

    “Indeed, the UK has too – difference is the EU isn’t proposing to break that agreement.

    “No way to explain that away. The UK needs to act on the Internal Market Bill, end of.”

  • Debbie White

    EU NEEDS TO BE MORE FLEXIBLE

    Foreign minister Dominic Raab told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show today that there was “a good chance of a deal if we get the flexibility from the EU on fisheries and a level playing field”.

    He also said the government would “never do anything to put at risk the Good Friday Agreement”.

    Disagreements on guarantees for fair competition, especially over state aid rules, and fisheries, a sector laden with symbolism for Brexit supporters in Britain, have dogged the talks since quitting the EU in January.

  • Debbie White

    BREXIT DEAL ‘THERE TO BE DONE’ – PM

    PM Boris Johnson said on Sunday a trade deal with the European Union was “there to be done”.

    His view that the agreement's broad outline was already “pretty clear” was shared in Brussels, he said.

    “I've always been a great enthusiast for a trade deal with our European friends and partners,” Johnson told reporters.

    “I think it's there to be done, the broad outlines are pretty clear.

    “We just need to get on and do it if we can. And I said that to (European Commission President) Ursula Von der Leyen just yesterday. And she totally agrees with me,” he added.

  • Debbie White

    BETTER TRADE DEAL EXPECTED UNDER BIDEN

    Former finance minister Sajid Javid has predicted a much better chance of sealing a trade deal under America's new administration rather than the “protectionist” Donald Trump.

    Britain is chasing trade deals around the world after leaving the EU in January.

    The aim is to project PM Boris Johnson’s vision of a “global Britain”, but talks with the US have slowed over the past few months.

    Describing himself as a “keen student of the United States’ trade policy”, Johnson said he believed there was a good chance the two sides would “do something on trade” despite Washington being “tough negotiators”.

  • Debbie White

    TRADE, CLIMATE CHANGE AND SECURITY TO DISCUSS WITH BIDEN

    “The United States is our closest and most important ally.

    “And that’s been the case under president after president, prime minister after prime minister – it won’t change,” PM Boris Johnson told reporters, adding he had not yet spoken to the US President-elect Joe Biden.

    Johnson said he looked forward to working with Biden and his team “on a lot of crucial stuff for us in the weeks and months ahead”.

    This included “tackling climate change, trade, international security. Many, many, many, many, many other issues,” he added.

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