Historic 'Black Boy' pub is renamed after 200 years

‘Perhaps we should refer to it as The Snowflake’: Locals accuse pub owners of ‘giving into woke’ as historic ‘Black Boy’ pub is renamed after 200 years because of Black Lives Matter movement

  • The Black Boy Inn, in Bewdley, Worcestershire, is now called The Bewdley Inn
  • Current pub leaseholders said it was changed ‘because of Black Lives Matter’
  • However, owners disputed this and said rename was part of a company rebrand
  • Historians believe ‘black boy’ was a nickname King Charles II’s mother gave him

A historic pub has changed its name after more than 200 years ‘because of the Black Lives Matter movement’.

The Black Boy Inn, in Bewdley, Worcestershire, is now called The Bewdley Inn.

The current leaseholders said Stonegate Pubs, the brewery which owns the 15th Century tavern, ordered them to change the name ‘because of the Black Lives Matter movement’ and that they had ‘no say in it’.

Furious locals have blasted the move, accusing the company of ‘giving into woke’. 

However, the owners said the pub was renamed as part of a company rebrand and disagreed with accusations it was to do with race. 

The Black Boy Inn, in Bewdley, Worcestershire, has been renamed The Bewdley Inn. The current leaseholders said the rename was ‘because of the Black Lives Matter movement’ but the pub’s owners disputed this, saying it was part of a company rebrand 

Historians believe King Charles II was referred to as the ‘black boy’ because it was a nickname given to him by his mother due to his dark hair and complexion.

The building dates back nearly 600 years and has been known as The Black Boy Inn since the early 19th Century. Before that it was known as The Blackamoors Head. 

Locals were critical of the decision to rename the pub, saying the term ‘Black Boy’ is not racist.

The current leaseholders of the pub said they had ‘no choice’ but to change the name.

They said: ‘The brewery wanted it changed, because of Black Lives Matter we think – we had no say in it.’

However, Stonegate Group, which is now the UK’s largest pub company running 4,708 venues across the UK, denied this.

A spokesman for the group, which was formed in 2010, said: ‘Following investment in our accommodation, we have changed our name to The Bewdley Inn to reflect our new business offer with letting rooms.

‘It is just a rebrand. Calling The Bewdley Inn helps customers identify that it has accommodation.

‘We totally disagree with some accusations that it has to do with the race. The original naming of the pub had nothing to with race either.

‘The Black Boy, the original name of the pub, came from a nickname of King Charles II whose mother called him ‘Black Boy’ due to his dark hair and complexion.’ 

The pub was previously known as The Black Boy Inn in honour of King Charles II, whom historians believe was referred to as the ‘black boy’ because it was a nickname given to him by his mother due to his dark hair and complexion

Furious locals took to the pub’s Facebook page, with one person saying: ‘Perhaps we should refer to it as The Snowflake from now on if the name can be changed that easily.’  

Julia Tracey said: ‘The Midlands was a Royalist region in the Civil War, so there are a few pubs with this name.

‘The old pub sign at The Black Boy had a painting of Charles II on it and it’s a pity this was taken down, as it’s a clear reference to the meaning of the name.

‘I’ve been in, many times with black friends, and my black relatives, and no one ever gave a s*** about the name.’ 

Ruth Roberts added: ‘It’s been The Black Boy for as long as I can remember and I used to work there. Political madness.

‘We should all stop bowing down to these people and stand up to them.’ 

At one point there were five pubs called The Black Boy in Bewdley, but now only one survives, on Wyre Hill.

The large number was attributed to Bewdley’s Royalist connections during the Civil War.  

There are believed to be around 25 pubs in Britain that are called ‘The Black Boy’ or similar variations.

The move comes after brewery giant Greene King changed the names of three pubs called The Black Boy and another called The Black’s Head.

Managing director Wayne Shurvinton said there was a perception the names were ‘linked with racism’.

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