JP Morgan's former Upper East Side carriage is listed for $27million

Investment bank founder JP Morgan’s former Upper East Side carriage house is listed for $27 MILLION after being transformed into luxury 5-bed home with pool

  • Rich financiers relocating to Manhattan, or those waiting out a costly renovation, might want to check out J.P. Morgan’s former carriage house in Upper East Side
  • The 25-foot-wide Upper East Side home, built around 1907, is coming back to market for $27 million
  • The pool formerly housed the space used to hoist cars up for oil changes back when it was the Morgan’s carriage house, said the home’s seller, businessman Karan Trehan
  • The five-story home is 7,200 square feet and features five bedrooms, three bathrooms and four powder rooms
  • There’s also a private garage, an elevator, screening room, open entertaining areas with 14-foot-tall ceilings, a wood burning fireplace, skylights and a landscaped roof deck

American financier and investment bank founder J.P. Morgan’s carriage house is back on the market for $27million after it was turned into a luxury five-bed home with a pool. 

The 25-foot-wide Upper East Side home, built around 1907, is on 188 East 83rd Street and it features a hidden pool, where the floor slides open, right under a gleaming marble floor.  

The area that’s now occupied by the pool used to lift cars up for oil changes back when it was the Morgan’s carriage home, said businessman Karan Trehan, the home’s seller.  

‘It was a giant pit,’ Trehan told the New York Post. ‘I expanded the pit and turned it into a pool, and put a skylight where the hoist was.’


Rich financiers relocating to Manhattan, or those waiting out a costly renovation, will have to break some serious bank to afford J.P. Morgan’s former carriage house in Upper East Side

The stately manse, which includes a hidden indoor pool (pictured), is owned by businessman Karan Trehan, who renovated it with his now ex-wife, a descendant of the Morgan family

Trehan purchased the carriage house — between Park and Lexington Avenues — with his ex-wife, who is a descendant of the Morgan family. 

His kids would use it as ‘a sort of frat house’ to host parties for Dartmouth students, according to Trehan. 

Following Trehan’s divorce, he transformed the home into a bachelor pad.

According to online news landscape Curbed, the house was once listen on the market as an $8,000-a-month furnished rental or for $5,000-a-month if it was leased as unfurnished in 2015.   

One of spacious five bedrooms (pictured) with plenty of sunlight in the Upper East Side pad

The 25-foot-wide luxury home has a dining area and two formal living/sitting areas, a wood burning fireplace and wet bar (pictured)

The home’s kitchen and dining area (piotured) has plenty of space to invite guests for a meal

The five-story home is 7,200 square feet and features five bedrooms, three bathrooms and four powder rooms.

There’s also a private garage, an elevator, screening room, open entertaining areas with 14-foot-tall ceilings, a wood burning fireplace, skylights and a landscaped roof deck.  

Sliding barn doors divide the main floor living room from another room deemed as the entertainment area with a kitchen and dining space.

One of the dressing room in the room featuring a table to put personal items and perhaps a bottle or two of refined liquor (pictured)

The staircase (pictured) inside the five-story home is made of oak with lights on every staircase to show the way

There’s plenty of outdoor space (pictured) including a landscaped roof deck and patio with a fire pit, plants and lights in the middle 

There is also a waterfall on a rear wall that opens to an outdoor patio with a grill.

One of the floors has a the main bedroom with a sitting area, gas fireplace, walk-in closet/dressing room and marble bathroom. 

At the top of the house, there’s a penthouse with a media room, full-sized projector and surround sound system.

Born into a prominent New England family in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1837, J.P. Morgan began his career in the New York financial industry in the late 1850s after studying at the Gottingen University in Germany.

He co-founded the banking firm that became J.P. Morgan & Co in 1871, and in the 1880s he established himself as a power player in the country’s railroad industry. 

Along with amassing immense wealth through the creation of such corporations as U.S. Steel, Morgan led efforts to bailout the U.S. Treasury in 1895 and 1907. 

He died in Rome in 1913, leaving behind a world-renowned art collection and a business that has remained a financial powerhouse into the 21st century. 

The listing brokers of his former home are Jed Garfield, Caylyn Sullivan and Lydia Rosengarten of Leslie J. Garfield.

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