KPMG wants 29% of staff to be working class by 2030

KPMG wants 29% of staff to be working class by 2030: Accounting giant becomes first major British business to set target

  • KPMG wants 29 per cent of its partners and directors to be working class
  • They define it as people whose parents had ‘routine and manual jobs’ 
  • These staff currently earn 8.6 per cent less than more privileged colleagues

Big Four accounting firm KPMG has become the first British business to set a target for the number of its staff from working class backgrounds. 

The company wants working class people to make up 29 per cent of its partners and directors by 2030.

The social category is defined by the company as those who have parents with ‘routine and manual’ jobs such as van drivers, plumbers, electricians and butchers.

Big Four accounting firm KPMG has become the first British business to set a target for the number of its staff from working class backgrounds

All of the firm’s 16,000 staff will also be forced to carry out training on ‘invisible barriers’ that working class people have to face, according to The Times.

Currently, 23 per cent of KPMG’s 582 partners and 20 per cent of its 1,297 directors meet the working class criteria.

These people are typically paid 8.6 per cent less than their colleagues whose parents worked in ‘higher managerial, administrative and professional’ jobs.

Bina Mehta, chairwoman of KPMG, says she comes from a working-class background.

She said: ‘I’m a passionate believer that greater diversity improves business performance. 

‘Diversity brings fresh thinking and different perspectives to decision-making, which in turn delivers better outcomes for our clients.’

Bina Mehta, chairwoman of KPMG, says she comes from a working-class background and wants to boost diversity at the firm

Ms Mehta was appointed after her predecessor Bill Michael was forced to resign for telling his well-paid staff to stop ‘moaning’ about cuts to their bonuses on a Zoom call.

He also dismissed the notion of unconscious bias as ‘complete and utter c**p’ and said staff should quit ‘playing the role of victim’ during the pandemic.

The 52-year-old Australian, whose own salary was trimmed by 14 per cent to £1.7million, had previously been referred to by staff as the ‘Donald Trump’ of KPMG.

People from working class backgrounds are becoming more upwardly mobile but are still less likely to be in a professional job.

Last year, 39 per cent of people from a working class family were in professional backgrounds, in increase of six per cent on 2014.

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